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20121215
20121215
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
a number of possibilities for us. how can we use these digital technologies and learn fm them to change education on our alone campus. what weighs will we see based on the experience of these mass courses. how can that transform in cambridge and boston. secondly, we see it as a way to get harvard ideas and harvard teaching out to a broader world and way to accumulate a lot of data that can be an extraordinary resource for anybody who like to use that material to ask questions about the nature of human learning and how it ought to be structured. on the point about spreading learning to the rest of the world, i have a very moving reaction to one bit of data. one of the pilot courses. when i was in india, i met with people in india who were wanting to interact with harvard. there is a need for engagement with our schools public health. we have enormous challenges in that area. i was talking to these individuals about what kind of courses we might involve them in. this online course that i described steele has overall more than 40,000 students and 9000 of them come from india. last january
to some useful resources on our website. we hope it can be of some help today in the wake of this devastating tragedy. we move now to tonight's discussion. and joining me on the panel are aarti kohli, senior fellow at uc berkeley's warren institute on war and social policy. paul rogers, environmental writer with the "san jose mercury news." stephen sock, investigative reporter with nbc bay area. and from los angeles, david lazarus, columnist with "the l.a. times." aurti, let's start with you. uc berkeley announced a new scholarship program for undocumented students. why did the university feel it was necessary to support these students? >> well, yes it's very excites news. $1 million from the foundation. and the university really feels strong obligation to these students because they're one of the most vulnerable set of students that we have. the average family income for these students is $24,000 a year. they're not eligible for federal financial aid. they're not eligible for pell grants. and so they've overcome great odds just to get to berkeley and we want to keep them
as i say from pennsylvania. it is one of the deadliest shooting rampages in u.s. history. all morning, we'll bring you updates on the victims and the investigation. we now know the name of the newtown shooter. we'll dig in on what was behind his monstrous act and a second crime scene tied to the first. what investigators found when they went to the suspected gunman's house. >>> i'm here in newtown, pennsylvania. behind me some distance is the school at which this tragic shooting took place. we have this story covered from all angles. i want to bring in my colleague john berman in newtown, in the town square. john, bring us up to speed on what we've seen since yesterday evening. >> hey, ali, i'm standing in front of the st. rose of lima church where last night there was an emotional vigil with about 1,000 people here. residents poured in for the 26 victims of this tragic attack. of course, 20 children were killed, six adults, all at the elementary school. and we're learning more about the shooter, which we're going to get into in a moment. but first, let's focus right now on the victim
of us. based on what you heard there, what, if anything, what more have we been able to clean about this shooter? >> well, quite a bit. we continue to clear up this confusion, almost the equivalent of the fog of war that has existed for the past day and a half. we're now told that there is no formal report of any altercation that took place between the shooter and the three or four staff members or teachers that some reports said took place on thursday. we now know, officially, that there's no known connection between the mother in the school, although we labored under the impression all day yesterday that she was a kindergarten teacher. somehow, erroneous information passed on to us. we know from the medical examiner, who personally conduct ed seven of the autopsies, realizing there's many more victims, seven of the autopsies, all which he indicated were first graders, and that each of these -- each of these children suffered between 3 and 7 gunshot wounds each. now, this is with a 223. this is an assault rifle. some information has suggested that the victim's mother had access or
for adults, let alone children. host: next is nicole in baltimore, maryland. tell us about -- go-ahead it. what grade do you teach? caller: i taught kindergarten, prek, first and second. now i teach teachers to teach in public urban schools. host: tell me about your first reaction when you heard about this and what went through your mind. do you have kids? caller: know, and my partner and i we talked religiously about kids and whether we will have them or not. it is definitely a terrible, terrible thing that happened. i actually coach teachers in training. i was sitting with one of my kochis' at the time when my partner call me to tell me what was going on. it was devastating. host: you coach teachers on how to deal with the situation? caller:no, i coach them on how to be a better teacher. talk about community engagement every time i sit down and coach them. i actually am not planning boot camp next week. we have a person coming in specifically to talk about family and parent engagement. i think we are at a. in history where we have to make a decision as humans. -- a point of history or
. to be honest with you, i am using a lot though as a case in point. to be honest, i thought i was going to meet with simple people. the conflict has not yet come to an end. we were pleasantly surprised. the operation we encountered was a lot more specific than we thought. they held elections. the chairman was a highly educated person with a ph.d. in engineering from france. dick also started to all different committees. -- they also started 12 different committees. judiciary, committee on finance, and they were working on a number of products. i love today to talk about those projects those councils are working on. >> can we say a few words between the relationship of this council and the military? what we specifically referred to as the free syrian army? >> a few months ago they found it coalesce. it is headed up by the inspector general. all of those groups do maintain their separate identities. they are all fighting under the banner of this council. i would say the relationship is characterized it has two characteristics, if corroborative one and a competitive one. if it were not for that th
to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement.
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)